2017 Conference Schedule

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Schedule details are not yet finalized so there may be small changes.

Time Program Location
8:30 am – 9:00 am Registration North Hall Conference Lobby
Poster Presentation: “Women in STEM: Libraries Paving the Way to Future Careers”
by Erin Ridgeway – Southwestern Oklahoma State University
North Hall 150
Breakfast
Panera Bread bagels, coffee, juice
North Hall 150
9:00 am – 9:30 am Welcome and OK-ACRL Business Report
by OK-ACRL President Karl Siewert – Northeastern State University, with panelists Kate Corbett – Langston University and Emily Tichenor – Tulsa Community College
North Hall 150
9:30 am – 10:30 am Guest Speaker Presentation
by Dr. James K. Elmborg – University of Alabama
North Hall 150
10:30 am – 10:45 am Break
10:45 am – 11:30 am BLOCK 1 SESSIONS
“Servant Leaders in an Era of Critical Librarianship”
by Stewart Brower – University of Oklahoma
TBA
Interlibrary Loan Panel Discussion
moderated by Karl Siewert – Northeastern State University
TBA
Engage Your Cultural Side: Cultural Intelligence
by Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran – University of North Texas
TBA
11:30 am – 12:45 pm Lunch
Mexican buffet bar by Elote Café
North Hall 150
12:45 pm – 1:30 pm BLOCK 2 SESSIONS
“The Transformative Library Worker: Notes Towards an Investigation”
by Steve Bales – Texas A&M University
TBA
“Website Accessibility is Easier Than You Think”
by Lee Webb – Oklahoma City University
TBA
1:30 pm – 1:45 pm Break
1:45 pm – 2:30 pm BLOCK 3 SESSIONS
“Re-Centering Diversity: Stepping Up at SWOSU”
by Frederic Murray – Southwestern Oklahoma State University
“Intentionally Disruptive: Developing and Delivering a Critical Information Literacy Course”
by Matt Upson, Holly Luetkenhaus, and Cristina Colquhoun – Oklahoma State University
TBA
2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Wrap-up & Prizes North Hall 150

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS

“The Transformative Library Worker: Notes Towards an Investigation”
by Steve Bales

Texas A&M University
The session will explore the concept of the “transformative library worker” through the lens of critical librarianship to present a possible model of counter-hegemonic librarianship, i.e., one that recognizes the library as an ideological institution and the transformative library worker as an organic intellectual operating within this capitalist institution. The speaker will present a prospective model of transformative library work consisting of three primary motifs: (1) a political clarity and commitment; (2) a theoretical inquisitiveness tempered by critical consciousness; and (3) an attitude of postprofessionalism. The values of these motifs on embracing a pro-active sense of social responsibility will be discussed, as well as implications for praxis will be discussed.

“Servant Leaders in an Era of Critical Librarianship”
by Stewart Brower

University of Oklahoma
Servant leadership, as written by Robert Greenleaf in his 1970 essay The Servant as Leader, posits that the most effective leaders are those who better serve the needs of their employees. Several of the major tenets of servant leadership align well with libraries in general, including listening, empathy, stewardship, and commitment to the growth of people. But how does servant leadership fit within the concept of critical librarianship, and what lessons does it have to impart?

“Re-Centering Diversity: Stepping Up at SWOSU”
By Frederic Murray

Southwestern Oklahoma State University
The student population in recent years at Southwestern Oklahoma State University has grown incredible diverse. In 2016, with an FTE of 5354 full-time students, more than 20 percent of our student body came from a rich variety of cultures, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. In order to provide relevant library services our librarians have engaged in outreach and collaborations with Administrators, Multicultural Student Services, Single Parent Networks, Student Groups, as well as individual students. We have made the library a welcoming place. In 2017, we partnered with the new Multicultural Student Services Office to provide programming for SWOSU’s first official recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15- October 15). This involved two literature-related lectures, a web guide, and solicited advice on the selection of a key-note speaker. We hope to build on this model to continue our engagement with our diverse student body. The session will focus on the collaborations and strategies used in re-centering the margins.

“Women in STEM: Libraries Paving the Way to Future Careers”
by Erin Ridgeway

Southwestern Oklahoma State University
STEM fields are notoriously underpopulated by women, especially in Oklahoma, where women fall far below the national average in STEM employment. Several university faculty, including one librarian, formed a committee that turned into a regional STEM alliance for the sole purpose of enriching girls’ experience in STEM. An annual STEM Camp for middle-school girls was developed, which provides unique curriculum with hands-on STEM experiences. The camp provides female role models and addresses the gender-based stereotypes that still exist in STEM. As evidence of the impact of the camp on the girls, there has been overwhelming positive feedback on post-camp surveys, and we are just now getting longitudinal data on the long-term impact of STEM camps for girls and future degree/career choices. This presentation will detail how the library assisted their efforts with grant writing, curriculum development, the use of maker-space technology, information literacy and digital footprints, marketing and branding.

Interlibrary Loan Panel Discussion
moderated by Karl Siewert

Northeastern Oklahoma State University

“Intentionally Disruptive: Developing and Delivering a Critical Information Literacy Course”
by Matt Upson, Holly Luetkenhaus, and Cristina Colquhoun

Oklahoma State University
Librarians at Oklahoma State University have developed a three-credit hour course titled They Wouldn’t Put it on the Internet if It Isn’t True: Information Literacy in a Post-Truth Society.
This course covers much of the ground that a traditional IL course would address (e.g. search skills, citations, source evaluation, etc.), but provides a critical lens through which students can examine how awareness of, access to, and quality of information have demonstrable impacts on social, economic, and political well-being of individuals, especially those within marginalized populations.
The presentation will detail the development of the course, course content such readings and activities, a review of student response to topics, and thoughts regarding future development of the course. Attendees will gain insight into practical application of critical librarianship in information literacy instruction.

“Engage Your Cultural Side: Cultural Intelligence”
by Dr. Michele A. L. Villagran

University of North Texas
As our workforces become more diverse, we face a greater challenge and problem–how to successfully manage increasingly diverse interactions. To address this concern, organizations and academic institutions are applying the framework of cultural intelligence (CQ). Cultural intelligence (CQ) is a person’s capability for successful adaptation to new cultural settings, that is, for unfamiliar settings attributable to cultural context (Earley & Ang). It is only recently that cultural intelligence has surfaced as an element that can increase job performance, personal well-being, and profitability. Cultural intelligence isn’t specific to a particular culture, rather it focuses on the capability to function effectively in culturally diverse situations.

Cultural intelligence is a new concept, officially defined in 2003. It is a globally recognized way of assessing and improving effectiveness for culturally diverse situations. It’s rooted in rigorous, academic research conducted by scholars around the world. Leading organizations in business, education, government, and healthcare are adopting CQ as a key component of personnel development and competitive advantage. Research demonstrates several consistent results for individuals and organizations that improve CQ, including:

  • More Effective Cross-Cultural Adaptability and Decision-Making
  • Enhanced Job Performance
  • Improved Creativity and Innovation
  • Increased Profitability and Cost-Savings

This concept allows individuals to reinvent themselves by understanding their own CQ, and applying differing techniques within the academic environment when involved with culturally diverse situations.

“Website Accessibility is Easier Than You Think”
by Lee Webb

Oklahoma City University
I will present a brief overview of website accessibility standards and why libraries should model best practices and compliance. I will demonstrate a few tools to help audit websites for compliance, and show that correcting the most common accessibility errors is fairly easy.